Civic Matters

'Issue 3' Archive

Introduction

Posted August 5, 2009

The Civic Matters editorial team is pleased to present to the Bryn Mawr College community its third issue. Readers may notice that this issue has a different look and feel than previous issues. Last summer, members of the editorial team convened a small group of students, staff, and faculty to hear feedback and solicit suggestions for the journal. This group brought insightful perspectives, creative ideas, and a great deal of enthusiasm to the editorial team, which resulted in a number of changes to this issue …

Policy Analysis and Economic Advocacy

Posted August 5, 2009

An important element in most service-learning or civic engagement programs like Bryn Mawr College’s Praxis program is the application of academic skills in a manner useful to stakeholders outside the academy. Writing for “outsiders” raises the stakes for students and instructors alike …

Learning to Listen: A Speech about Love and Social Justice

Posted August 5, 2009

Below is an excerpt from Page Walker Buck’s convocation speech, delivered at Bryn Mawr College’s 2008 convocation ceremony. Page spoke as a representative of the Graduate School of Social Work and Social Research, where she completed her master’s and doctoral work. Page began her speech by acknowledging graduates’ friends and family members in the audience, including her grandmother …

“There is No Hierarchy of Oppression”: Excerpts from an Interview about Understanding Social Justice

Posted August 5, 2009

Bryn Mawr College held its own Community StoryCorps session on Martin Luther King, Jr. Day 2008. Students, faculty, and staff had the opportunity to interview each other in front of a small audience of community members about any aspect of their lives that they wished. Though not coordinated through the national StoryCorps project, organizers of the Bryn Mawr event had similar goals of honoring individuals’ experiences and building community through the sharing of personal stories …

Networking and Knitworking: Social Change That’s Warm and Fuzzy

Posted August 5, 2009

Last semester, a diversity conversation at the Bryn Mawr College Multicultural Center focused on how to move from conversations about diversity to actual social change. One of the students asked, “Maybe we should ask ourselves what social change would look like in our campus community?” It occurs to me that we might also want to ask ourselves, “Where is social change already happening on this campus?” Maybe we can learn about what social change could look like by paying some attention to the places where it is already happening and by learning from those who are involved …

Mi Experiencia en Perú: Living and Learning in Tacna

Posted August 5, 2009

As my flight pulled into Tacna’s little airport, I pressed my nose against the airplane window to catch my first nocturnal glimpse of the desert city. Exhaustion from the long journey turned into adrenaline as I gathered my bags from the overhead compartment and proceeded down the airplane’s stairs into the arrival gate. With the help of some Peruvian friends I’d made on the plane, I clumsily arranged my heavy bags onto a cart and wheeled my way outside where the families and friends of the passengers were waiting to greet them …

From Bryn Mawr College to the Philly Fellows Program: An Interview with Two Alumnae

Posted August 5, 2009

Megan Bailey and Rebecca Woodruff didn’t go far when they left Bryn Mawr College last May for the Philly Fellows program, and yet as fellows this year, they have had experiences they might not have imagined as students. Philly Fellows is a year-long fellowship program that offers recent college graduates the opportunity to work in capacity-building positions in a range of non-profit organizations in the city. Fellows receive housing, a living stipend, and various leadership and professional development opportunities …

Being on the Political Sidelines

Posted August 5, 2009

I have always had an interest in politics, but it has always been somewhat at a distance. In elementary school, when it was time to choose pen pals, I didn’t want to write to just any person; I wanted to write to Amy Carter, the daughter of then-president Jimmy Carter, but Amy and I didn’t discuss politics …